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Archive for May 20th, 2012

Colcannon and soup

Colcannon:
So when I made my corned beef and cabbage, I added so many other veggies to the crockpot that I had no room for the cabbage. Therefore the head I bought sat in the fridge unused for many days. I stumbled on the recipe for Colcannon, and being an Irish boy and never having made it, I went for it.

I started with this recipe as a base. I had to up the quantities, since I went with half the head to use it up. I could have used more, but I didn’t know how much I’d like it, so didn’t want to make that much.

As it turned out, I did rather like it. The most expensive bit is the butter, but for the amount you use versus the total amount of food that you get, it’s not bad at all. I managed to fill a 9×13 pan, and ate it on and off for days afterwards. I know, though, for next time to chop the cabbage more finely, like cole slaw. I was lazy, and wound up with large shreds. I think it’ll be better with the potatoes and cabbage more evenly distributed.

Soup:
The other half of the cabbage. Well, it sat in the fridge even longer. I finally realized I needed to do something with it, since parts were going black. So I did a cream of various vegetables soup. Cut off the black bits, chopped up the cabbage, then some other vegetables, sauteed them a bit, made a roux, added the veggies and some spices, added beef stock and water to cover, then the milk to make it creamy. I’d not made a cream soup in a while, and wanted something different than your standard clear soup.

Result? A very large pot of soup of which I still have some frozen servings. You might want to take some Beano before eating a large amount of cabbage, by the way. Your loved ones will thank you.

Sorry for not giving a recipe for the soup, but there wasn’t one. I’ve made various types of soup so often, I don’t really need one. For a specialized soup like French Onion, yeah, but  a generic soup like what I made, not so much. Soup is one of my go-to foods for refrigerator cleanout. Whatever you have in the fridge that you’re afraid might go bad soon, chop it up and throw it in a pot with some spices and water and/or stock (and maybe some wine), cook for a while and you have soup. If you want, there’s a gazillion recipes you can find on the web. But making soup isn’t advanced calculus.

If you don’t already, try making it on a semi-regular basis. Depending on what you use, it can provide many inexpensive and nutrituous and filling meals. Or occasionally expensive, if you want to go fancy now and then.

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