Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Boca Raton’

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


In this post, I’ll cover the last part of Palm Beach County. Most of the sites are in 4 cities, with much potential zigging and zagging. How much you do is up to you.

For example, the first city, Lake Worth. Do you want to go to the Museum of Polo & Hall of Fame? It’s near the Turnpike, so well west, and not much else nearby but golf courses and country clubs. (see Google map)

The last historic districts in the county are in Lake Worth. The most northern is College Park, which is almost in West Palm Beach. The other two are close to downtown, and the other NRHPs. More south is the Osborne School, which doesn’t look particularly historic. But you know, books and covers. Go over to A1A and check out Eastover, a fancy estate on the ocean. It has the same address as Mar-A-Lago, but is in Manalapan. Like a lot of A1A through residential areas, there’s not much parking along the street. Fortunately, there’s a patch across from Eastover that’s not marked with “No Parking” signs or anything. So you can stop there and look at Eastover from outside the fence. (see Google map)

Next is Boynton Beach. A couple stops off US 1, then over to A1A is the Gulf Stream Golf Club. I didn’t know of the club when I was in the area before, but I suspect it’s private. So you may not be able to see any of the historic bits, should you go. (see Google map)

There’s a shipwreck off the coast around here, the Lofthus. There’s no historical marker I’m aware of, so it’s another look-in-the-direction-it-sunk ones, unless you dive.

  • Lofthus (¾ mile north of Boynton Inlet, 175 yards offshore) (NRHP)

After Boynton Beach is Delray Beach. Yep, South Florida, life’s a beach. The Courtenay Residence and J. B. Evans House are around A1A, the rest inland. The inland-iest is 6 jiggedy miles west of the (tricky to get to) old railroad station. It’s the Morikami Gardens. I’ve heard really good things about it, but wasn’t able to fit it in the last two times I passed through. Hopefully I can see it when I’m down there again. (see Google map)

The last stop in our trip through Palm Beach County is the Mouth of the Rat. Well, that’s the literal translation of Boca Raton. No one knows for sure why it’s named that, though of course there are theories. A likely one for the “mouth” part is there’s an inlet close by, and “boca” also means inlet. Whatever the meaning, I kind of like Boca.

The Boca Raton Old City Hall houses the local history museum. I’d like to check it out, but I’ve always gotten there when it’s not open. There’s a small railroad museum down US 1, with a couple of NRHP railcars. The museum itself is in an old train station that’s also on the NRHP. It was a dingy day when I was in Boca, but there was something about the place that I liked. Maybe the scattering of Mediterranean Revival buildings, maybe that it didn’t feel as built up as most of the surrounding area.

I need to get back there anyway, because there’s one niggling NRHP in the county that I’ve not photographed. It’s Boca Raton Fire Engine No. 1, also known as Old Betsy. The address that’s listed isn’t valid. Apparently it’s been moved to another fire station. I’ve not been able to quite pin it down. The historical society, oddly, couldn’t help. I guess I need to try getting in touch with the county fire department again. Hopefully it’s still around, and not been consigned to the junk heap. (see Google map)

Gosh, that’s Palm Beach County finished! The next US 1 posts will be easy, since there’s only about 35 NRHPs in Broward County, and a few museums and such. It’s Dade County that’s going to take some work. It’s got over 160 NRHPs, the most of any county in the state. But there are other places I’ll be doing before I get to them. Until next posting, see you on the road!

Route length: miles

Advertisements

Read Full Post »